Slide: Making an application fully IPv6 compliant

Slides from RIPE66: Making an Application Fully IPv6 Compliant

Today at the RIPE66 meeting in Dublin, Ireland, Bert Hubert of PowerDNS fame gave a great presentation about “Making an application fully IPv6 compliant“:
Slide: Making an application fully IPv6 compliant

The video and audio for the session should be available soon. I very much enjoyed Bert’s presentation and he had a few points that I will think about adding to the next version of the book. One specific point is around collecting statistics. Bert noted that in IPv4 you again typically only have one IP address to worry about for each connection, while in IPv6 you may have many different IP addresses for a connection (or you could have). And so you may need to think about your storage of all that statistics information.

I only had two minor quibbles with Bert’s slides:

  • On slide 11, Bert suggests there could be several different ways of displaying IPv6 addresses with port numbers.  As I stated in the question time, RFC 5952 states that it should be Bert’s choice “a”.
  • On the issue of how to choose whether to use the IPv6 or IPv4 interface, the “Happy Eyeballs” technique defined in RFC 6555 is one that many developers are now using.

Overall, I was very glad to see Bert’s presentation out there as we need to have more such presentations helping application developers think about these issues of migrating to IPv6.

P.S. If you want to easily refer people to Bert’s slides, he provided the very easy URL of:

tinyurl.com/ipv6-checklist

“Migrating Apps To IPv6” Author And Editor Get To Meet Face-To-Face

A curious aspect of writing a book is that you never actually need to meet the people with whom you are working at a publisher. Everything can be done online with maybe an occasional phone call thrown in. Editors, production staff, publicists… all the interaction happens primarily through email.

It’s nice, though, when you do get a chance to put a face with a name. As shown below, I got a chance to catch up with Mike Loukides, the editor at O’Reilly who first approached me about the “Migrating Applications to IPv6” book project and who worked with me to make it happen:

York loukides

This was at the O’Reilly Tools of Change conference back in the beginning of the year. (Excellent conferences, by the way!) I just stumbled upon the photo and thought I should post it. I still haven’t met the other editors and staff who helped me with the book, but that is indeed the way it works.

Updated List of IPv6 Resources for Application Developers

Recently I noticed that my list of IPv6 resources for application developers had not been updated since the second version of Migrating Applications to IPv6 was published in June 2012.  I’ve now gone ahead and updated the list to have all the links that I added to the second release of the book.

Now, granted, some of the links may not make much sense without the context of what is in the book, but they are all there so that you can easily visit them.  (And hey, if you want the context, why not buy the book? 😉

If you have suggestions for additional resources I should add, please do contact me as I’m always open to considering new content to add to the book.  From the beginning this has always been conceived as a collection of guidance for application developers looking to move their applications over to IPv6, so please do pass along any thoughts you think I should consider adding to the book. (Thanks!)

New Mailing List for “Migrating Apps to IPv6” Updates

Would you like to be notified when updates are made to “Migrating Applications to IPv6“?  If so, there’s a nifty little sign-up box over in the right sidebar that will add you to an email distribution list that I will use ONLY to alert you to news about the book.  Info about updates will also be posted here to the book’s blog, of course, and will also appear on the Google+ page and in my normal Twitter stream. But I realized recently that some readers might want to receive specific messages when updates are available.  If you purchase the ebook directly from O’Reilly, you’ll get notified through their notification system, but if you purchase through another retailer – or would just like to receive an extra update, please feel free to subscribe.  I promise I won’t spam you or do anything else with your email address outside of alert you to the new updates.

Thanks for your interest in the book!

Updated Version of “Migrating Applications to IPv6” Book/Ebook Available Through O’Reilly

If you’ve bought the ebook or printed version of the book within the past few weeks, you should have received the most recent updated version.  As I mentioned previously, I submitted to O’Reilly a range of updates – and have confirmed that an updated version is now shipping.  It includes:

  • Added new section on recent events and changes that make it critical for application developers to be thinking about IPv6.
  • Added section on connecting to DNS servers over IPv6 and about DNS and DHCPv6
  • Added sidebar about RFC 5952, “A Recommendation for IPv6 Address Text Representation”
  • Expanded text about “Happy Eyeballs” algorithm and included mention of RFC 6556 for testing for happy eyeballs.
  • Added brief info about lessons learned from World IPv6 Day
  • Added info about World IPv6 Launch in 2012
  • Added new section on testing resources
  • Added new section about setting up an IPv6 test network
  • Updated IPv6 NAT info to point to RFC 6296
  • Added warning about SMTP’s way of showing IPv6 addresses
  • Added additional resources, including a new section about some informational RFCs that may be of interest to application developers.

If you previously purchased the book directly from O’Reilly, you should have been notified of this update.

I’m very appreciative of the feedback received thus far – and definitely welcome further feedback!  I’ve also received many kind words and comments that the book has been very helpful.  That’s great to hear… and exactly why I wrote it!

Updates Submitted For “Migrating Applications To IPv6” Book

Very early this morning, I submitted a range of updates to the book to O’Reilly’s production team. As this is the first formal update I’ve made, I’m not sure of the exact process from here, but at some point soon the updated content will be available as part of the normal book.  I’ll post about it here on the site when it’s ready, and anyone who bought the ebook directly from O’Reilly will be automagically notified about how to download the updates.

Here’s a snapshot of the changes I made to the book:

  • Added new section on recent events and changes that make it critical for application developers to be thinking about IPv6.
  • Added section on connecting to DNS servers over IPv6 and about DNS and DHCPv6
  • Added sidebar about RFC 5952, “A Recommendation for IPv6 Address Text Representation”
  • Expanded text about “Happy Eyeballs” algorithm and included mention of RFC 6556 for testing for happy eyeballs.
  • Added brief info about lessons learned from World IPv6 Day
  • Added info about World IPv6 Launch in 2012
  • Added new section on testing resources
  • Added new section about setting up an IPv6 test network
  • Updated IPv6 NAT info to point to RFC 6296
  • Added warning about SMTP’s way of showing IPv6 addresses
  • Added additional resources, including a new section about some informational RFCs that may be of interest to application developers.

I’m pleased with how it came out… there’s been a great amount of new information added in the last few months that will be helpful for application developers and it was great to incorporate that into the book.

Next up, I’d like to add some images that illustrate some of the points in the book… but that’s the next update…

… and please do let me know if you have suggestions for additions you’d like to see in the book, either as a comment here or via email.

“Migrating Apps To IPv6” Ebook Now Available in Kindle Fire (KF8) Format

KindleFireIf you use the Amazon Kindle Fire to read ebooks, the folks at O’Reilly have now optimized all their ebooks to work with the new “KF8” format used by the Kindle Fire.

When you login to your Oreilly.com account and look at your purchased ebooks (or if you buy the book from O’Reilly), the “Mobi” file there is now a KF8 file that you can download to your computer and upload to your Kindle Fire (or any other Kindle).

Now, I don’t know that I’ve necessarily done anything to the text of “Migrating Applications to IPv6” that would strongly benefit from the new KF8 format (nor do I have one to try it on), but these regenerated Mobi files may in fact display better now on the Kindle Fire. Regardless, it’s great to know that the publisher of the book is looking at what can be done to make the books work better on newer devices.

The world of ebook publishing is at a fascinating place right now… and given some of the experiments O’Reilly is doing I’m looking forward to writing more of these updates as we all collectively continue to evolve this thing-formerly-known-as-a-book!

World IPv6 Launch Coming On June 6, 2012 – Will Your Apps Work with IPv6?

WorldIPv6Launch 250On June 6, 2012, World IPv6 Launch will mark the time when IPv6 is permanently enabled by many operators, website operators, content providers and organizations around the world.

Will your application(s) work on IPv6? What will you need to do to make sure that your apps work as well on IPv6 as on IPv4?

The main point of the book was to help you think through the questions and look at what you need to do.

Will you be ready?

First Update Started To “Migrating Apps to IPv6” – Any Further Feedback?

After moving through a job change and reaching a steady state with a family medical issue, I’ve finally got some cycles ahead of me to get back to something I’ve wanted to do for several months now… get an update out to this book!

I’m currently writing more text and am looking to do the following to the book in this update:

  1. Add a few more graphics to illustrate points, particularly the “happy eyeballs” concept.
  2. Expand coverage of the “privacy address” issue.
  3. Expand on the issues around Carrier-Grade / Large-Scale NAT.
  4. Add in some of the lessons from World IPv6 Day on June 8th.
  5. Add examples / case studies from people who have gone through the migration of their app over to IPv6.

On this final point, I have a few developers who I am contacting to see if they are willing to share their story, but I am definitely open to including more case studies. If you have migrated one of your applications to work on IPv6, I’d love to hear from you.

Beyond this list, do any of you have other points you would like to see included in the book? Or areas in the book that you would like to see expanded?

Please either leave a comment here or drop me an email to let me know. Thanks!

I’m not sure of the exact timeframe but I’m hoping to get an update out by the end of November.

P.S. Note that any of you who bought the ebook directly from O’Reilly will be automatically notified when the new version is published online.

Time Warner Cable Seeking More Volunteers for Residential IPv6 Trials

Ipv6 200If your cable company here in the USA is Time Warner Cable and you get your high speed Internet access through them, they are looking for more volunteers for their residential IPv6 trials. This message below went out yesterday to the NANOG mailing list:

Time Warner Cable is expanding our residential IPv6 trials in several markets, and we need more people. If you’re a Time Warner Cable High Speed Internet subscriber, and are interested in participating in our IPv6 trials, please let us know! We have a short form at

http://www.timewarnercable.com/Corporate/support/IPv6_volunteerform.html

that will help us find the right mix of people, equipment, and locations, to get the most out of our trials.

Thanks in advance for participating!

As a Time Warner Cable subscriber, I immediately headed over to complete the form. My whole home office uses IPv6, but it’s through a tunnel out to Tunnelbroker.net and while that works okay, I’d love having native IPv6.

Now, whether or not little old Keene, NH, qualifies as one of the “several markets” to which they are expanding their trials remains to be seen…